When I’m working in OneNote on the night before classes, I always find it interesting to see who else is there working.  The Windows10 version of OneNote (and OneNote Online) both include a People Presence option to show you who else is working in the same Notebook/ClassNotebook.

When you click on the name of the page, you jump there — so you can work together.
While I was doing screenshots, you can see how another student has entered the ClassNotebook, and the first student has moved from one page to another as they do their homework.

And then, when I flipped over into our Faculty OneNote, I had one teacher looking at how to send emails to parents for one of her extracurricular programs (in our Tech Help section), while one was working on our Student Leadership Conference and the other two working on incoming pages.

While there is an aspect to this of “surveillance”, it’s meant to energize collaboration.  
In the ClassNotebook, it keeps me aware of when and how students work if I happen to be watching. It’s particularly interesting when I’m working late at night and I see students active in my ClassNotebook — in typical hypocritical fashion, I encourage them to work earlier and get some sleep.
I look forward to this user-behavior data to be available for discovery, since it’s something that the OfficeGraph (link likely not helpful) & MyAnalytics (link likely very helpful and informative) would be able to include.  Knowing (well, kinda) how long a student worked on a OneNote page, and what path they took as they build their content, is something I don’t know now and may provide additional information about the student, how they learn, and what they understand.

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