Tag: Uncategorized

Stop Ditching Homework

I know it’s trendy for folks to proselytize “Ditching Homework” – it’s a catchy phrase, great memories of your own homework are likely hard to find and you won’t get invited to speak at conferences or sell books if you’re encouraging folks to do the something they’re already doing.Now, I’m only speaking of high school […]

Tech is not the be-all and end-all

Although I said I’d blog every day in November, I meant “school days” and didn’t intend to blog on the weekend. But I had a few minutes between tasks and was browsing Twitter and came across Draper’s post: It’s (still) not OK for teachers to remain digitally illiterate. Here’s why… Now, for starters, I encourage […]

Observations

I had the opportunity to visit a school just outside of Edinburgh yesterday. While my overall intent was to look at the use of OneNote and Office365, what resonated with me so strongly was the fluidity with which both educators approached their classes.  I admit, I was taking notes furiously.  So much so that I […]

Facilitating Feedback in OneNote

When we were creating the precursor to the OneNote Class Notebook, I was heavily influenced (well, I still am) by the work of Black & Wiliam and so improving the quality and quantity of formative assessment is cooked right into the Notebooks.  Likely the whole reason the Class Notebook exists in  its present structure in […]

Defying gravity

Andrew Campbell always encourages me to think about things, no less this time an utterance I boldly share from his Facebook timeline. ————Prediction: Your TL will be full of reaction to the horror of the shooting in #Orlando insisting things must change. Nothing will change————Andrew, you’re wrong.  And you have to be wrong. No, we’re […]

Milestones (for a Mentor)

We received great news this week: we’ve been designated a Microsoft Mentor School for 2014; one of only three across Canada. From the website: schools must demonstrate a commitment to innovation and the ability to overcome obstacles in preparing students to be 21st century learners. In addition, they must have developed programs that can serve as […]